Ghost town in B.C. to come alive in celebration of tolerance

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Ghost town in B.C. to come alive in celebration of tolerance
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Ghost town in B.C. to come alive in celebration of tolerance
Ghost town in B.C. to come alive in celebration of tolerance
Long after the houses fell into ruin and the families moved away, people still visit the only remaining structure in a tiny Community turned ghost town is still here, and that is still play. We look forward to coming to it on the weekends and for worship. Brothers. Pageant Sarge bow out were born and raised in solving west of Duncan is a symbol of what the town once stood for a Chinese, the white boys and everybody. Just like one big family and everybody helped each other stories of racism and conflict they’re hard to find welcome. Diversity wasn’t only displayed through classroom friends and coworkers. There was romance to Joan Mayo married the eldest son of the town’s founder Mayo sing. Not your typical Union. In the early 1950s, but if that seems significant, there’s more her father-in-law and Indian immigrants created the town in 1917, 30 years before self Asians could even vote. That’S the foundation was built on all the different nationalities difference in person. Wonderful way to grow up Jones describes Mayo sing as an entrepreneurial man who recognized The Economic Opportunity of BC’s Forest looking for a place on the island, where there would be him. The story that I was told his at 35 men came over and they feel so they don’t mail here and make a little town named after Village in India and Canada centered on this mail. From what I understand ever anywhere, there’s a mill, it’s always a school. So that’s what happened to me why it became a little village, but the work eventually die down with the mails closure once stood here finished a sad reality for those with roots and Baldi, but in some ways the heart of the community lives on T piece of History that remains continuing to represent with the town once stood for
A ghost town in B.C. is set to come alive again with festivities at the Sikh temple in Paldi, a community that set the bar for building relationships with different races 100 years ago.
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